Pfleger’s Excuse

So what does Pfleger regret about calling Hillary Clinton a racist and saying that he hates America from the pulpit at Obama’s church?

‘I didn’t think I would get caught.’

All that is well and good, but how, as a friend and passionate supporter of Obama’s campaign for president, could he do what he did, with cameras rolling?

Pfleger’s short answer? He didn’t think the service and his “conversation” — a more casual address than a classic sermon, he explained — were being broadcast live online, as Trinity often does.

“They told me it was down,” Pfleger said. “Their live streaming had been down all day, and they didn’t know whether it was back up. . . . I regret the dramatization that I was naive enough to believe was just going to be kept among that church.”

The most consolation to me is the silence in the church when he called America the greatest sin against God.

Obama seems to be surrounded by more people who think that America is fundamentally evil — Wright, Ayers, Pfleger, even his wife Michelle — than people who don’t.

Birds of a feather flock together.  You can’t spell Believe without lie.

14 Comments

  1. Jazzy says:

    Not even going to go there with you today Phelps, I’m just too damn happy to give a rat’s ass about any uncalled for negativity today.

  2. Phelps says:

    I stopped reading at “Greta the Hun.” I’m not reading any more screeds with racist slurs.

  3. Jazzy says:

    “Screeds with racist slurs” I do believe he was calling her butt ugly with this statement which, she is BTW. Too bad you did not finish reading the post Trill did a better job of explaining and illustrating the finer points of race and religion than I ever could.

  4. Phelps says:

    Why should I listen to a racist? And how is “he was just calling her ugly” any different than Imus’ “nappy headed hos”?

    Hun is a slur against people of Germanic descent. It’s even in the dictionary as such. Jesus, how would you take it if I started calling Obama “Shaka Obama?” It’s the same F-ing thing.

  5. R says:

    “The problem with the powerful and popular racist media is that a lot of white people simply don’t understand how racism permeates the lives of blacks and Latinos.”

    Hmmm, does this make me a white racist Latino who doesn’t understand how racism permeates my life – even though it doesn’t?

    I am thoroughly confused.

    “Were Jesus alive today, Fox would be nailing him to the media cross for spreading his message and criticizing the realities that the oppressed live with daily.”

    More confusion. If by being Latino does that mean I am automatically oppressed? I never knew that. I actually thought I’d been doing pretty goddamn well my entire life! Go figure.

    “Her entitled ass helped create this racist atmosphere back in PA, Kentucky and West Virginia with her repeated statements that a black man can’t win…”

    Orly? That there is fuckin’ news to me. Now, I’d like an actual quote that Hillary Clinton uttered the words “a black man can’t win.” I mean, surely a blogger wouldn’t twist the truth in order to make a point? Surely not! Blogging is teh srs bsnss!

    I think what Hillary’s campaign was doing was looking at the poll results, which is a reflection of the people’s thoughts. Or is the blogger perhaps implying that the Clinton campaign has created a mind control beam and turned the opinion of millions of people?

    The article is a joke.

  6. Jazzy says:

    @R “Hmmm, does this make me a white racist Latino who doesn’t understand how racism permeates my life – even though it doesn’t?”

    No R that just means you have not experienced racism, and lucky for you count yourself blessed.
    “More confusion. If by being Latino does that mean I am automatically oppressed? I never knew that. I actually thought I’d been doing pretty goddamn well my entire life! Go figure.”
    No being Latino does not make you oppressed my being black did not make me from the time I entered this world feel oppressed or discriminated against. This came much much later, my mother (unusual I think for most black mothers) never spoke of race in our home until we learned of it in school. Her answer was simple you have to experience it before you will ever understand. I and my brother both experienced IT [discrimination and prejudice] only then did she feel that she could talk about her like experiences. So again I reiterate if you have never been discriminated against count yourself lucky. No shame in that, it is what it is.

    “Orly? That there is fuckin’ news to me. Now, I’d like an actual quote that Hillary Clinton uttered the words “a black man can’t win.” I mean, surely a blogger wouldn’t twist the truth in order to make a point? Surely not! Blogging is teh srs bsnss!”

    I believe its called innuendo

  7. Jazzy says:

    @Phelps When put that way you are correct, I concede the point.

    Yet I feel I should make my position on Imus clear: 1) never thought he should have lost his job, 2) people say ignorant shit all the time call them on it then and there and see how they respond, most times people are either not thinking something is as offensive as it is taken, or they truly mean to offend.

  8. Phelps says:

    It’s a bigger problem than that. I’m starting to think that black people as a whole have a narcissism problem, and mean that as clinically as possible. Black people see race and racism in everything white people do. Things that have absolutely nothing to do with race. By the same token, black people seem to be completely oblivious to casual racism in their own speech.

    It is a lack of empathy.

  9. Jazzy says:

    “It’s a bigger problem than that. I’m starting to think that black people as a whole have a narcissism problem, and mean that as clinically as possible. Black people see race and racism in everything white people do. Things that have absolutely nothing to do with race. By the same token, black people seem to be completely oblivious to casual racism in their own speech.”
    For the most part probably 90% of black people are immediately suspicious of white people. Reasons vary from person to person but they all ultimately lead to some form of pejorative comment that has been made. Example my husband on college campus at the end of his final exams him and his friends are walking from class back to their dorms out of NO FRIGGIN WHERE this chick leans out of her truck and screams NIIGGEEER. They all turn to each other and are like WTF brought that on. Shit happens like this on a daily basis and I’m not just talking about to African Americans. I have personally witnessed it against Arabs, and Indians quite often lately. Its there so people have to deal with it most people don’t deal with it the best way they then internalize it and (your word) project it upon everyone else.

    However on the flip side if some harm was done to a person by an African American could I then understand their desire to immediately distrust and have unsavory thoughts about African Americans in general the honest answer to that from IMO is hell yes. To me Phelps it’s human nature simple as that.

  10. Phelps says:

    If those were the only instances, yes. But the hypervigilance of the afrosphere (like the Imus incident, the Tiger Woods “lynching” thing, the “niggardly” kufluffle) points to narcissistic injury.

  11. Jazzy says:

    What instances are you talking about? The ones were probably 90% of the African American population has been subjected to some bigotry or only the instances were some physical harm has been committed. Some black people get easily hyped over comments and want to immediately protest, others say FU and continue with their day, and still others try to impart a different point of view.

    For me personally, I am ALWAYS on my guard when I meet some new person that is not of my same ethnic background. For multiple reasons 1) I don’t want to give them the impression the neck rolling sista (Sapphire) they see on TV is me 2) I don’t want them to believe the drop it like its hot all day sista (Jezebel) is me 3) I don’t want them to think the ignorant uneducated sista is me (Mammy). It is not until I become comfortable with a person who does not look like me on the outside that I am able to open up and truly relax around them and get to know them on some personal level. That’s real talk people either have to deal with it or not. I don’t believe people are accepting of others with their arms wide open upon first meeting and if you do I want to say you some property.

  12. Phelps says:

    What does that have to do with race? Everyone is on their guard when they meet new people to not look ignorant, slutty or uncouth.

  13. Phelps says:

    (Comment removed at the request of the author.)